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What is Disorderly Conduct?

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If you have been charged with disorderly conduct, you may be a bit confused about the crime for which you have been accused. Disorderly conduct can be a confounding charge, because it is a very broad and subjective criminal violation which involves various offenses such as disturbing the peace or causing a commotion. In Arizona, the criminal statutes define disorderly conduct and outline which offenses can constitute this particular crime.

The Arizona State Legislature delineates in §13-2904 that this crime is committed when any person disturbs the peace or quiet of a neighborhood, family, or person. A person can be charged with disorderly conduct in Arizona if he/she engages in fighting or any violent or other disruptive behavior. While a person may also be charged with assault for this type of behavior, it will depend upon the circumstances of the incident. Often-times a person is charged with disorderly conduct combined with other violations, such as assault, criminal damage and other similar violations.

Additionally, if a person makes unreasonable noise with disregard to others, or uses abusive and offensive language or gestures towards any other person present that is likely to provoke physical retaliation, this can be considered disorderly conduct. It is also disorderly conduct to make a protracted commotion with the intent to prevent the transaction of a business in a lawful meeting, gathering or procession.

For example, unnecessary gestures and motions to prevent a transaction can be considered disorderly conduct in some circumstances. Also, if a person refuses to obey lawful order and disperse after he or she is told that he or she is breaking fire code or is not acting in the best interest of the safety of others, this be considered disorderly conduct. Recklessly handling, displaying, or discharging a deadly weapon or another dangerous instrument is considered a class 6 felony charge, whereas all other behaviors described above are considered a Class 1 misdemeanor charge.

To learn more about disorderly conduct and other related crimes, please visit our website here and here. If you have been charged with disorderly conduct and are seeking representation, contact the Firm today to arrange a free case evaluation to discuss your case with an experience criminal defense attorney.

Attorney Trent Buckallew is a dedicated and experienced East Valley criminal defense lawyer who is focused on defending individuals charged with a crime Mesa, Phoenix, Scottsdale and surrounding valley cities. You can read more about him by liking the Firm on Facebook. Check out the client testimonials to see what others are saying about this experienced and aggressive Mesa criminal defense lawyer!

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